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Installing A Touratech Extended Sump Guard

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Having owned my R1200GS for nearly 3 years, one of the modifications that I’ve been meaning to do for some time now is replace the original sump guard with a Touratech extended sump guard. However, I never quite got around to it, even after I ripped the original sump guard off the first time round – for some reason I just bought new rubber mounts, bent the original guard mostly back into shape and bolted it back onto the bike.
An Abused Sump Guard
About two months ago I broke two of the four rubber mounts for the sump guard again, and have been riding around with it cable tied in since. Eventually my girlfriend took the hint and bought me a Touratech sump guard for my birthday about two weeks ago :-)
Touratech Sump Gaurd
Having had previously experience of fitting a sump guard I was expecting to fit the Touratech one pretty quickly. Unfortunately that wasn’t to be the case. The first problem occurred when I went to remove the old sump guard. To my horror one of the bolts was snapped off inside the engine block. It also had thread-lock on it so there was no chance of screwing it out. A call to CW Motorcycles the next morning confirmed my fears – the broken bolt would need to be drilled out and the the thread re-tapped.

I’m not a person to panic unnecessarily and for good reason on this occasion, as I knew just the person to help – fellow RideArounder Shane! A quick tweet of my problems and he came up trumps with the offer of the use of his thread tapping kit for the very reasonable fee of £160 (I read that as a beer/coffee).

Saturday afternoon and I met up with Shane & Dave at RideAround HQ (Shanes house!) for an afternoon of bike maintenance, as they had to prep their bikes for their Bucket List Tour in just under two weeks. After a quick trip to the local hardware shop we had all the tools required for the work on my bike: Drill, Drill bits (1mm, 3mm, 6mm, 6.5mm), thread tap, hex keys and a 10mm spanner.

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As I have never drilled out a snapped bolt and, to be honest, was a bit chicken about doing it, I convinced Dave to do the drilling for me. He is an ex BMW Technician so is used to doing botch jobs such as drilling out bolts. With a bit if gentle persuasion we eventually started cutting the new thread.

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With the new thread cut, the time had come to fit the new sump guard. This was where I thought the going would get easier. However I was wrong. The rear backet for the new guard required a couple of clamps around a bar on the bike frame. These proved tough to put on and hold closed whilst putting the bolt through. In fact it probably took longer to do that than to drill and tap the broken bolt!

Once the rear bracket was fitted it was plain sailing. All the mounting bolts were fitted and the torqued up to the standard torque settings of the original sump guard. Job done!

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About The Author

Adrian Ritchie

Aidy has been riding motorbikes since just after he left university in 2003. His first bike was a 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 bought for £1000. His second bike was a Suzuki GSF600 Bandit, bought for his adventure to Norway in 2005. Two years later he sold the Bandit to Shane (for him to learn on) and upgrade to a BMW R1200GS... which was promptly trashed one month later by a SMIDSY. Having had the R1200GS repaired, Aidy has spent the next three years giving it a damn good thrashing off-road. 2011 saw the R1200GS take to the remote tracks and desert pistes of Morocco... it managed to keep up with the 650 enduro bikes that make up the rest of the group and made it back to Guernsey in (mostly) one piece. In January 2012, he traded in the R1200GS for a new R1200GS Adventure, planning to use the Pegaso 650 for off-road racing. However, the lure of smaller enduro bikes proved too strong and in April 2012 purchased a BMS G450X