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Baglux Tank Cover on a R1200GS

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Having given away my old luggage when I sold my Bandit 600 to Shane, I thought it was about time I got a new tank bag for my new BMW R1200GS. The first bag I got was a Cargo Endurance Tank Bag. Whilst it gets great review, what I didn’t realise was that my R1200GS has plastic and aluminium panels covering the tank and therefore the Cargo bag wouldn’t stick, it being magnetically mounted.

Thankfully I was able to return the Cargo bag and get a credit note. After a bit of hunting around I turned up some info on Baglux tank covers and bags. Rather than being magnetic, the Baglux system has a cover for the tank which is permanently attached to the bike and the tank bag then clips into this cover. The tank covers are also colour matched to the bike so that, from a distance, it looks like there is nothing there.

Fitting the cover to the bike is fairly easy but it does pay to prepare a little before hand. I found some instruction specific to the BWM R1200GS which I read first, although I thought they could be clarified a bit so here are my version of the instructions (with my own pictures):

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  1. Wait for a warm sunny day. The tank cover is best attached when warm so either leave it in the sun for a while, or warm it next to a radiator… but don’t get it too hot.
  2. Remove forward side fairing panels. This is done by undoing the two D-Ring clips on the outside of the panels and a twist clip on the inside of the panels just inside the bottom front edge. The panel can then be gently pulled off.
  3. Remove the front seat.
  4. Remove the small black fairing panels just in-front of the seat. These can be just pulled off carefully.
  5. Clean, dry and polish the tank fairings, this is critical as any dirt under the tank cover will damage the paintwork.

The Baglux cover can now be placed over the tank. The first step in the installation is to use the existing fairing bolt to attach the cover to the fairings. The bolt should not be tightened too much at this point as the cover will need to be able to move during installation.

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Next, the forward straps can be passed inside the fairings beside the front forks. The front straps pass around the frame and back up to be secured on the buckle. The back strap is passed under the steering yoke and back up on the other side to be fastened. Again these straps should not be fastened too tight at this point.

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Next, the rear straps on the cover can be attached. I did the back straps first. Passing them around the frame then back up to the clip. The strap was only just long enough to reach, so you my need to pull it quite tight.
The forward straps where then fitted. I hooked it onto the aluminium tank cover which ends just under the bottom end of the Baglux cover. The strap is then adjusted for length.
At this point the tank cover is quite stiff and wont appear to fit the tank terribly well. This will last for a couple of days as the material settles down to take the shape of the tank. For now the straps and fairing bolt can be tightened up as best as possible. This will need to be repeated in a couple of days once the cover is bedded in.

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Finally the side fairings, side cover and seat can be refitted and the bag attached to the tank cover. The only thing that remains is to stand back and admire your handy work and the tank cover and bag that you’ve just fitted… and take it for a quick spin :)

But is it worth it? One of the benefits of the Baglux system is that it has a tank cover that is permanently attached to the bike. This means that the tank has always got protection, especially if you’re like me and like to go getting muddy off-road. Having a bag that attaches to the tank with four quick clips is also very handy instead of having to muck about with various straps. Filling the bike up with fuel is a breeze, I just unclip the bag at the front and it hinges back, leaving the filler cap easily accessible, other bags I’ve previously used have been I right pain when it comes to fuelling up.

The one downside I’ve found with the Baglux is the bag itself but that is more my own fault with bag choice. I went for the small Minea bag. Off the bike the bag is really good as a small back pack – it comes with built in solder straps – but on the bike it’s small size doesn’t fit the shape of the tank terribly well, I suspect the newer Rider or Impact bags would be a better fit.

Overall it is a quality piece of kit which has served me well for the two years that I’ve had it.

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About The Author

Adrian Ritchie

Aidy has been riding motorbikes since just after he left university in 2003. His first bike was a 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 bought for £1000. His second bike was a Suzuki GSF600 Bandit, bought for his adventure to Norway in 2005. Two years later he sold the Bandit to Shane (for him to learn on) and upgrade to a BMW R1200GS... which was promptly trashed one month later by a SMIDSY. Having had the R1200GS repaired, Aidy has spent the next three years giving it a damn good thrashing off-road. 2011 saw the R1200GS take to the remote tracks and desert pistes of Morocco... it managed to keep up with the 650 enduro bikes that make up the rest of the group and made it back to Guernsey in (mostly) one piece. In January 2012, he traded in the R1200GS for a new R1200GS Adventure, planning to use the Pegaso 650 for off-road racing. However, the lure of smaller enduro bikes proved too strong and in April 2012 purchased a BMS G450X